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Former Clemson pass-rusher Shaq Lawson was an addition made during the Rex Ryan -Doug Whaley era. The Buffalo Bills selected him with the 19th overall pick in 2016. He was expected to be a defensive force for the Bills, but instead, he has been a major disappointment.

A shoulder surgery limited Lawson's rookie campaign to just 10 games, and he has appeared in a mere 21 contests over the past two seasons. While he has shown occasional flashes of potential, Lawson has not been the dominant edge-rusher Buffalo has been looking for.

In his first two years, Lawson has amassed just 46 total tackles and six sacks.

"Shaq is a guy that this franchise put a lot of stock in with a first-round pick [in 2016]," general manager Brandon Beane said last month, per Matthew Fairburn of The Athletic. "It's no secret he hasn't lived up to that."

Beane and the Bills' current regime have no real attachment to Lawson, which means the defensive end could be looking at his last chance to prove himself in Buffalo.

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Offensive tackle Matt Kalil was a first-round pick of the Minnesota Vikings back in 2012, and it initially looked like he would be a future star. He earned a Pro Bowl nod as a rookie but hasn't quite been the same player since.

In fact, Kalil has been a merely above-average lineman over the past few years, which is why it was surprising to see the Carolina Panthers hand him a massive Hendrix Dress in White size M also in LSXLXS NBD Popular Cheap Online jYRYtT
last offseason.

Jason Fitzgerald of theSporting News recently listed Kalil's contract as one of the worst in the NFL. He had the following to say:

"Kalil spent most of the 2016 season on injured reserve and had not lived up to his billing as a top draft pick, but the Panthers last year looked at the glass half full and went all-in on a five-year contract. Had it done a one-year contract, Carolina would have gotten better terms in 2018 because, despite being healthy, Kalil still failed to stand out as one of the top left tackles in the NFL."

Kalil is being paid like the former top-five pick that he is, and like a top-tier left tackle. He isn't the latter, however, and for a team with just over $2 million in cap space, that's disappointing.

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The Chicago Bears selected former West Virginia wideout Kevin White with the seventh overall pick in 2015. Blessed with both speed (4.35-second 40) and size (6'3", 216 lbs), physical potential has never been an issue for White.

"Everybody sees, he’s very gifted," Bears wide receivers coach Mike Furrey said of White, per Colleen Kane of the Chicago Tribune .

The problem is that White just hasn't been able to stay healthy. He missed his rookie season with a shin injury. He was placed on injured reserve with a broken fibula in 2016. He suffered a broken shoulder blade in the 2017 season opener, again ending the year on injured reserve.

MPR News Reflections and observations on the news

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As mentioned here in the past, most people have never read the U.S. Constitution, but that usually doesn’t stop them from claiming constitutional protections that don’t exist.

The latest example is the controversy because an engineer at Google, for some reason, thought his opinion on the biological differences between men and women was something the rest of the corporate behemoth should pay attention to.

He’s been fired and with good reason.

Unsurprisingly, the people who believe there are biological reasons why women are underrepresented in the tech industry are claiming Google violated the man’s First Amendment rights.

It should go without saying that there’s no constitutional right in your private company to accommodate your misogyny, though it can hardly be surprising that James Damore believes he’s got one.

On Marketplace, Lee Rowland, a senior staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech, Privacy, and Technology, again fights the good fight to explain it .

No doubt Damore will be the poster child for those who view the firing as another example of Google’s unwillingness to accommodate conservative views — a slap in the face to conservatives who don’t believe the word should be hijacked as a synonym for misogyny — but there’s an even better reason for his firing, former Google senior engineer Yonatan Zunger writes: He’s not a very good engineer.

Today might not be a bad day to brush up on that employee handbook.

The First Amendment really only acts as a restraint on government. In fact, the first few words of the First Amendment are: Congress shall make no law restricting freedom of speech or of the press or religion.

So when you work for the private sector and your employer is not the government, the Constitution gives you zero protection in terms of keeping your job based on what you say.

So while it is possible that states and localities could pass laws protecting speech — and a very, very tiny number of cities and localities have done so — 99.9 percent of the time, there is no legal barrier to a private employer firing an employee because of their speech at or outside of the workplace.

Essentially, engineering is all about cooperation, collaboration, and empathy for both your colleagues and your customers. If someone told you that engineering was a field where you could get away with not dealing with people or feelings, then I’m very sorry to tell you that you have been lied to.

Solitary work is something that only happens at the most junior levels, and even then it’s only possible because someone senior to you — most likely your manager — has been putting in long hours to build up the social structures in your group that let you focus on code.

I’ve been to many, many endocrinologists and not one did any type of nutritional testing. No, I find if you have B12 deficient tingling feet and go to the average endocrinologist you get put on Lyrica. Your endo is very unique. If the nutritional tests he gives you are serum testing instead of red blood cell tests I would find a more knowledgable alternative doctor.

California recently passed a bill making it mandatory that its medical schools require substantial nutritional training… first state in the union to require it. Right now future doctors have minimal training in nutrition and can opt out of it.

“On average, (medical) students received 23.9 contact hours of nutrition instruction during medical school”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2430660/

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A good Endocrinologist does more than just a CBC or give you a prescription telling you to try it and see if it helps your symptoms. They do Metabolic profile, Amino Acids, A1C, etc. These are the chemicals your body needs to sustain life. Tingling feet? I never had that with B-12 or vitamin D deficiency. I do know a few people that are diabetic and they complain of tingling feet. They’re also being treated with Lyrica. I have been with the same endocrinologist for 22 years. You couldn’t pay me to see his assistants, much less a different endocrinologist. No matter what your medical situation maybe, he talks about weight and nutrition with all of his patients.

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I am a PA working for an Internal Medicine practice and I routinely check patients for their Vit B12, Vit D, etc. I must agree that during my schooling I received very little nutrition education. I have learned a lot from this and other sites.

Not all PAs are the same. You could always tell your physician what it is you like about him/her and why you don’t want to see their assistants. They may have one that has a similar thought process they would recommend to you should the physician not be available.

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I had foot surgery late last summer for pain I’d had for well over a year, which was diagnosed as a neuroma (swollen nerve). A couple weeks post surgery, I started having major problems (horrible insomnia, surgery foot just didn’t feel right, felt depressed, had terrible pains in my legs and feet, heart palpitations, fatigue). My PCP referred me to an endocrinologist who had me get a whole battery of tests. But she NEVER ordered a B12 test (or vitamin D test for that matter). My cortisol was a little higher than normal, but that’s about all she found.

My PCP then decided I needed an antidepressant, Lexapro. That made me feel just awful and it was causing me vision problems, so I quit taking it after a week. Fast forward two months later, I was using a walker to get around and was seriously feeling like I wasn’t going live to see the New Year. No one at my HMO could figure out what was wrong with me, nor did they care. About every couple of weeks I would make an appointment to see my doctore and ask for yet another set of tests, hoping to figure out what was going on with me.

Finally in late Oct a doctor who was substituting for my regular physician for that day ordered a B12 test, which was found to be 196. My PCP said it was so close to the low cutoff of 200 that he didn’t think it was significant. Since by then it was the ONLY test that appeared abnormal, I did some internet research and learned my symptoms matched many of those for B12 deficiency. I then insisted he begin treating me for B12 deficiency. Another blood test later on determined I had pernicious anemia.

It’s now 5 months after I began treatment and am still recovering from neurological symptoms and may have permanent nerve damage to my feet. As yet I am unable to to work (I was an engineer and lost my job since I’ve been out since Aug) and have difficulty walking due to pain in my feet.

I am so angry with the medical system for 1) not catching this simple vitamin deficiency, 2) using a low cutoff of 200 which is WAY TOO LOW, and 3) doing a poor job of helping me manage my treatment (cyanocobalamin worked for me at the beginning but now makes me very sick for about a day after I get a shot and I have had to find alternatives on my own as the HMO formulary only has cyanocobalamin).

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